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 1 
 on: June 23, 2017, 11:29:31 PM 
Started by Lorilou - Last post by Lit Love
1) Seriously???  That's insane.  You're sure that the adjudicator didn't change his/her mind after more records were submitted?  Did you literally just do a no show?

4)  Because she's incompetent?


 2 
 on: June 23, 2017, 10:48:20 PM 
Started by Lorilou - Last post by Lorilou
Here are issues I see based on reading the determination from the CD.

1. I was advised by my rep it was ok to miss a CE by the MD so the RFC was filled out with answers that are not favorable and do not match the muscle-skeletal report given to me by my rep to have my doctor fill out.

2. The determination clearly states "The claimants Y condition is severe, but does not meet a listing." I'm not sure what Y means.

3. Hindsight 20/20 it looks like I could have worked with my doctors more to get the evidence I needed. My medical records just show treatment not clearly stated impairments. The only form I had my doctors fill out was a musclo skeletal form given to me by my rep.

4. There were records submitted from my childhood with "this source is outside the adjudication period." Not sure why they were submitted as I was told by my rep I didn't qualify for a DAC claim and get this. I received a text from her that even though I do not qualify for a DAC claim she will be submitting all of my childhood records again...I don't get it.

5. They do not like that the records submitted for mental evidence were by a licensed psychologist and not a psychiatrist.

Feeling pretty stressed about now.




 3 
 on: June 23, 2017, 10:08:54 PM 
Started by Lorilou - Last post by Lorilou
SS will start be evaluating your most severe impairments first.  If A doesn't qualify, then they move to B, and so on.  Let's say impairment C is unlikely to meet a Listing, but perhaps A + B + C will equal a Listing.

An applicant shouldn't list impairments that don't effect their ability to work, because some ALJ's will question their credibility.  Things like type II diabetes managed by meds shouldn't be listed, but I don't think it makes sense to remove them after the fact though.  

See DP's response above.


Thank you for the clear explanation.

 4 
 on: June 23, 2017, 10:04:17 PM 
Started by Lorilou - Last post by Lorilou
Why is there no advantage to try to restrict the things that the adjudicator will review? 

Well, to start with, the adjudicator is required by SSA law to review any and all Medically Determinable Impairments and determine the degree of functional restriction, if any, that is caused by that MDI.

Second, by trying to divert the adjudicator's attention from one (critical) MDI could lead to the question of what is being hidden or covered up.

Far better, in my mind, is to try to have your representative draw attention to the functional limits cause by both physical and mental MDI's.

Some non-attorney reps, just like some attorneys, are better than others.  If you have lost all faith in your rep. change her.  Just be careful to get a full release from the first rep.  Most reps, attorney or otherwise will be happy to release a disgruntled client.

Ok, that makes sense. It seems they were hung up on the lack of medical evidence of mental impairment. My physical impairments are what impact my ability to work the most and mental as a consequence. That is why I asked.

Is there a template for the release? Like a standard form or letter?

 5 
 on: June 23, 2017, 09:43:31 PM 
Started by Lorilou - Last post by Lit Love
SS will start be evaluating your most severe impairments first.  If A doesn't qualify, then they move to B, and so on.  Let's say impairment C is unlikely to meet a Listing, but perhaps A + B + C will equal a Listing.

An applicant shouldn't list impairments that don't effect their ability to work, because some ALJ's will question their credibility.  Things like type II diabetes managed by meds shouldn't be listed, but I don't think it makes sense to remove them after the fact though.  

See DP's response above.

 6 
 on: June 23, 2017, 09:42:08 PM 
Started by Lorilou - Last post by Different Perspective
Why is there no advantage to try to restrict the things that the adjudicator will review? 

Well, to start with, the adjudicator is required by SSA law to review any and all Medically Determinable Impairments and determine the degree of functional restriction, if any, that is caused by that MDI.

Second, by trying to divert the adjudicator's attention from one (critical) MDI could lead to the question of what is being hidden or covered up.

Far better, in my mind, is to try to have your representative draw attention to the functional limits cause by both physical and mental MDI's.

Some non-attorney reps, just like some attorneys, are better than others.  If you have lost all faith in your rep. change her.  Just be careful to get a full release from the first rep.  Most reps, attorney or otherwise will be happy to release a disgruntled client.

 7 
 on: June 23, 2017, 09:09:24 PM 
Started by Lorilou - Last post by Lorilou
Why?

 8 
 on: June 23, 2017, 09:02:26 PM 
Started by Lorilou - Last post by Lit Love
Looked through CD. Read determination. My claim is for mental and physical. Is it possible to amend the claim at this point (I'm in 60 day appeal window) to a physical only claim without mental?



There is no real advantage to doing that. 

 9 
 on: June 23, 2017, 08:59:50 PM 
Started by Lorilou - Last post by Lorilou
Looked through CD. Read determination. My claim is for mental and physical. Is it possible to amend the claim at this point (I'm in 60 day appeal window) to a physical only claim without mental?


 10 
 on: June 23, 2017, 08:13:35 PM 
Started by RobtSpeed - Last post by Just Me
If she is still in high school when she turns 18, she will have to go into the local SSA office and apply for her Auxiliary Benefits to be sent directly to her until she graduates. She will also have to have an enrollment form filled out by her school. Unless a court appoints someone to be responsible for her.

Her parents income and resources are considered when applying for SSI until she turns 18. She will have to meet SSA Adult Criteria for disability to be approved  for SSI when she turns 18.


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