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Topic: Do you need to report this?  (Read 635 times)
stellamartin123
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« on: May 13, 2017, 01:24:03 AM »

If you're on SSDI, do you need to report to SSA if you get married?  How about if you have a child?
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Helper
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« Reply #1 on: May 13, 2017, 05:18:37 AM »

You need to report to SSA if you have a child when you are on SSDI because child would be eligible for dependent benefits so you would need to report the birth & file for dependent benefits.  SSA does not care about marriage of SSDI recipients- but if you move or change your name, make sure you report it.

SSI recipients need to report marriage & having a child.  Spousal income & assets is counted for SSI so it can effect eligibility.  Children of SSI recipients are not eligible for dependent benefits but adding another person to the household effects the living expense calculations & the SSI recipients fair share to not have the 1/3rd reduction.
Logged
Age at Application: 26 age of onset (but I did not apply until 28)
Date Applied: August 2011
First Approval/Denial Date: November 2011
Additional Info: I was fortunate to be approved on my initial application due to extensive medical records (12+ doctors) & documentation of unsuccessful work attempts even with significant accommodations
Scooter
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« Reply #2 on: May 13, 2017, 12:30:33 PM »

Just remember, if you get married and are on ssdi your joint income may be high enough to be taxed.  Mine alone is not high enough but I am planning on getting married and our incomes together will put me over the taxable limit.
Logged
Age at Application: 38
Disability: Bipolar disorder 1, psychotic episodes, personality disorder, anxiety disorder, knee surgery,
Date Applied: April 2013
First Approval/Denial Date: May 2013 denied
Hearing Date: October 2014
ALJ Approval/Denial Date: Approved FF December 2014
Salvette
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« Reply #3 on: May 13, 2017, 12:40:54 PM »

Just remember, if you get married and are on ssdi your joint income may be high enough to be taxed.  Mine alone is not high enough but I am planning on getting married and our incomes together will put me over the taxable limit.

I'm married and have to pay taxes on my ssdi....I get so bent over this at tax time, although generally it's 80% of the ssdi that is taxable, it still makes a big difference...also, in my state and probably others, if you are on permanent disability and your combined income is under a certain amount (and you're a homeowner) we have been able to get a property tax freeze for the part 6 years.  The first year we were eligible is the base year, and then every year after we get a property tax refund based on the taxes paid for that year minus the base year. Works out to about $500 a year now, one of the few "perks" of the married disabled :/
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stellamartin123
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People helped 1
Posts: 52


« Reply #4 on: May 13, 2017, 07:00:47 PM »

Just remember, if you get married and are on ssdi your joint income may be high enough to be taxed.  Mine alone is not high enough but I am planning on getting married and our incomes together will put me over the taxable limit.

I'm married and have to pay taxes on my ssdi....I get so bent over this at tax time, although generally it's 80% of the ssdi that is taxable, it still makes a big difference...also, in my state and probably others, if you are on permanent disability and your combined income is under a certain amount (and you're a homeowner) we have been able to get a property tax freeze for the part 6 years.  The first year we were eligible is the base year, and then every year after we get a property tax refund based on the taxes paid for that year minus the base year. Works out to about $500 a year now, one of the few "perks" of the married disabled :/

Does California have this tax benefit?  If so, please let me know where I can get more information about this.
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Helper
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People helped 219
Gender: Female
Posts: 2265


« Reply #5 on: May 13, 2017, 07:16:49 PM »

Just remember, if you get married and are on ssdi your joint income may be high enough to be taxed.  Mine alone is not high enough but I am planning on getting married and our incomes together will put me over the taxable limit.

I'm married and have to pay taxes on my ssdi....I get so bent over this at tax time, although generally it's 80% of the ssdi that is taxable, it still makes a big difference...also, in my state and probably others, if you are on permanent disability and your combined income is under a certain amount (and you're a homeowner) we have been able to get a property tax freeze for the part 6 years.  The first year we were eligible is the base year, and then every year after we get a property tax refund based on the taxes paid for that year minus the base year. Works out to about $500 a year now, one of the few "perks" of the married disabled :/

Does California have this tax benefit?  If so, please let me know where I can get more information about this.

I just did a search online.  It looks like California only has a property tax credit for disabled veterans, not all disabled individuals.  http://www.boe.ca.gov/proptaxes/exempt.htm

There is a property tax postponement program for disabled individuals but it has very low income limits (& if you are married you likely won't qualify) & you have to have at least 40% equity in the home. Additionally, they put a lien on your property so you have to pay the taxes plus 7% annual interest when the property is sold. http://www.sco.ca.gov/ardtax_prop_tax_postponement.html  It seems like a better program for an older person that is just trying to stay in their home a little longer.  Additionally, the program was suspended for 8 years & just recently reinstated.  So, I would not depend on the program being around every year.
Logged
Age at Application: 26 age of onset (but I did not apply until 28)
Date Applied: August 2011
First Approval/Denial Date: November 2011
Additional Info: I was fortunate to be approved on my initial application due to extensive medical records (12+ doctors) & documentation of unsuccessful work attempts even with significant accommodations

« Last Edit: May 13, 2017, 07:29:17 PM by Helper »
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